Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving

This Thanksgiving has been my favorite so far, and the actual day isn’t even here yet! Just listening to Charlotte recite what she learned at preschool every day has been a lesson in life. At four years old, she’s full of amazement, wonder and fun facts (yesterday was something about white and red blood cells that even I didn’t understand).

I love watching her face as she laughs her way through “The Thanksgiving Song”: “I’m glad I’m not a turkey…They stuff you and bake you, and then they all taste you! I’m glad I’m not a turkey on Thanksgiving Day.”

And every day this week, when she’s climbed in the car after school, she starts excitedly talking about gratitude.

“Guess what I’m thankful for today?” The appreciation for life literally pours out of her.

As I was driving her home, I thought, “At what point does this change?”

Because I’ve certainly experienced it myself. As a child, I had that feeling of amazement and gratitude on a daily basis. I remember bouncing a tennis ball against the side of my garage for hours–just enjoying the sun and the feel of the ball in my hand. I was just happy to be alive. Of course, I wasn’t consciously thinking about being alive. But I was enjoying the moment–taking pleasure in the littlest of things.

And as I got older, that feeling began to seep away. First, there were some mean girls (ugh), and I allowed my spirit and sense-of-self to get crushed. Then there was the sinking feeling that came with getting C’s on Math tests. And then there was the pressures of bills and jobs and life. Sure enough, that incredible feeling of being in the sun with a tennis ball in my hand faded and, in its place, came thoughts of “Why me?” and “I can’t do this” and “Life is so hard.” I kept feeling as though life was just dropping things on my doorstep, and I had to deal with them.

I finally realized that it wasn’t healthy to live that way–to always feel as if life owed me something, and it was my fault for not getting the best out of it. My four year old doesn’t feel that life owes her anything. On the contrary, she enjoys all that life has given her, and she voices her gratitude aloud.

I don’t want that shift to happen for her. Is it inevitable? Gosh, I hope not. How can I help her stay grateful for what she has instead of always reaching for something more? Because that’s where true happiness lies–in looking at what’s around us and saying, “Thank you.”

Today I can make a choice. I can always reach for something more, different, or better…or I can land right where I am. So here’s where I am today: I’m in my soft, colorful pajamas on a Wednesday morning. I’m typing away in the study, listening to the soothing sound of rain on the window. My husband is in the kitchen making mac-and-cheese for the Thanksgiving party at school. My two-year-old is still fast asleep in her bed. And the sound of a happy four-year-old playing make believe floats through the air. Thank you, life.

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